Prism wpf navigation

Passing parameters

Navigating in a Prism application is conceptually different than standard navigation in Xamarin. While Xamarin. Forms navigation relies on a Page class instance to navigate, Prism removes all dependencies on Page types to achieve loosely coupled navigation from within a ViewModel. In Prism, the concept of navigating to a View or navigating to a ViewModel does not exist. Instead, you simply navigate to an experience, or a unique identifier, which represents the target view you wish to navigate to in your application. This means when you request to navigate to the MainPage, you will provide the string "MainPage" as the navigation target. This process uses reflection which introduces a small performance hit. If you would like to avoid this performance hit, you can provide the ViewModel type when registering your Page for navigation. So when we want to navigate to the MainPage, we would provide the "CustomKey" as the navigation target. When writing a Xamarin. Forms apllication, it is common to use a different view for a specific platform. Prism enables you to register different views for different platforms while using the same ViewModel. To do this, simply register your views using the IContainerRegistry. RegisterForNavigationOnPlatform method. Depending on which platform your app is running on, the appropriate view will be provided for the respective platform. Another common scenario when creating a Xamarin. Forms aplication is the need to provide a different view based on the device the app is running on, such as Desktop, Phone, Tablet, etc. Depending on which device your app is running on, the appropriate view will be provided for the respective device. Once your views are registered for navigation, you must use the INavigationService to perform navigation. There is a caveat while injecting the Navigation Service into your ViewModels. The current version of the Prism. Forms library requires that you name the injection parameter precisely as navigationService Otherwise the Navigation Service is unaware of the current View it is used on. This is a limitation of the dependency injection container. Relative navigation will always push pages onto the current navigation stack relative to where you are calling the INavigationService. NavigateAsync method. Absolute navigation will reset the entire navigation stack no matter where you call it, or where you are in the current navigation stack. It is equivalent to Application. Going back to the previous View is as simple calling the INavigationService. GoBackAsync method. However, sometimes you require full contol over whether or not you perform a modal or non-modal navigation. To tell the Prism navigation service how to handle the navigation request, set the useModalNavigation parameter in the INavigationService. NavigateAsync method signature. If you do not want this behavior, and instead wish to force ViewC to be navigated to modally, you must set the useModalNavigation parameter to true. The same approach applies to GoBackAsync. For example, let's assume your navigation stack is rooted with a ContentPage which then has a NavigationPage pushed modally onto the navigation stack. In this case, if you were to call GoBackAsync from ViewA, nothing would happen because you are within the context of a NavigationPage and Prism does not know if you want a non-modal or a modal GoBack operation. Navigation Basics Navigating in a Prism application is conceptually different than standard navigation in Xamarin. Page navigation in Prism is accomplished by using the INavigationService. Important If you do not register your Pages with Prism, navigation will not work.

Understanding Prism – Part 2 – Regions


GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together. Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community. Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account. Note that the support for the Windows. Frame control is not present, but may be added later on by creating a control that works using a view-first pattern. If required, UI Tests and unit tests may be added to this PR in the same way it is done for the Uno Platform, using simulators on hosted agents for speed of builds. Thanks dansiegel and brianlagunas for the amazing work on PrismLib! Thanks jeromelaban for this amazing PR. There are some extremely different concepts between Prism. Forms and Prism. WPF navigation, but I might suggest taking a peek at the e2e app for Prism. It's a better example of providing some testable surface area with Dialogs, Modules and various Navigation paradigms. I'm also working on migrating the Container specific tests for WPF to be largely shared as part of the removal of the CommonServiceLocator, hopefully that will help give you a baseline for some unit testing. Skip to content. Dismiss Join GitHub today GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together. Sign up. New issue. Copy link Quote reply. This comment has been minimized. Sign in to view. This was referenced Apr 8, Does Uno support Prism? Uno platform fails in Xamarin.

Introduction to Prism


By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I'm starting a new project in Wpf, and am now looking into using Prism. For now I'm simply trying to set up the navigation of the application using Prism. Unfortunately my lack of experience with the framework makes it a bit difficult to get started. The navigation region will be the same for all different main region views, and I therefore define the menu in the shell. When clicking any menu item I'd like to add a view to the region using Prism. First; is this something one typically will use Prism for? If so; what's the typical approach? And I mean on a more structural level. My impression is that Prism will make my application much more scalable in the end, and I see that I get some other advantages from it - like the IoC container. So I would like to use it - if I could only get through the first steps. I've got a sample that uses a little more of the CAG feel for modules contributing to a menu and how to add views to a region. It ought to make things a little more clear. Prism will be a great way for you to achieve this functionality and it is pretty easy to do once you understand the principals. The way I will do it is to add event listeners in the start up event of your Main Region. When you select your item in the menu, you fire the event. When that happens your Main Region will handle the event and you clear the current view from the Main Region. Then create the new view you want to use and add it. How are we doing? Please help us improve Stack Overflow. Take our short survey. Learn more. Using Prism for navigation in Wpf application Ask Question. Asked 10 years, 7 months ago. Active 2 years, 5 months ago. Viewed 7k times. Active Oldest Votes. Anderson Imes Anderson Imes I already got this sample. I got the concepts, but I couldn't really get my arms around it and put it all together in my own applications. But with some further investigation this sample really helped me after all - so I'm on the right track now. Marking this as the answer as the provided sample code was what lead to the solution. Bumbuska, Prism will be a great way for you to achieve this functionality and it is pretty easy to do once you understand the principals. Subscribe LoadView, ThreadOption.

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By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. How are we doing? Please help us improve Stack Overflow. Take our short survey. Learn more. Asked 4 years, 6 months ago. Active 4 years, 6 months ago. Viewed 1k times. RequestNavigate "ContentRegion", App. What am I doing wrong? ConfigureContainer ; Container. ContainerControlledLifetimeManager ; Container. ToString ; Container. Robert J. What you want is, when the app loads navigate to the App. DetailPage, right? You have to call the region. RequestNavigate in some form of event button click, etc. Oct 5 '15 at Active Oldest Votes. Show ; Prism. Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook. Sign up using Email and Password. Post as a guest Name. Email Required, but never shown. The Overflow Blog. Q2 Community Roadmap. The Unfriendly Robot: Automatically flagging unwelcoming comments. Featured on Meta. Community and Moderator guidelines for escalating issues via new response…. Feedback on Q2 Community Roadmap.

Navigation Overview

As the user interacts with a rich client application, its user interface UI will be continuously updated to reflect the current task and data that the user is working on. The UI may undergo considerable changes over time as the user interacts with and completes various tasks within the application. The process by which the application coordinates these UI changes is often referred to as navigation. Frequently, navigation means that certain controls in the UI are removed, while other controls are added. In other cases, navigation may mean that the visual state of one or more existing controls is updated—for example, some controls may be simply hidden or collapsed, while other controls are shown or expanded. Similarly, navigation may mean that the data being displayed by a control is updated to reflect the current state of the application—for example, in a master-detail scenario, the data displayed in the detail view will be updated based on the currently selected item in the master view. All of these scenarios can be considered navigation because the user interface is updated to reflect the user's current task and the application's current state. Navigation within an application can result from the user's interaction with the UI via mouse events or other UI gestures or from the application itself as a result of internal logic-driven state changes. In some cases, navigation may involve very simple UI updates that require no custom application logic. In other cases, the application may implement complex logic to programmatically control navigation to ensure that certain business rules are enforced—for example, the application may not allow the user to navigate away from a certain form without first ensuring that the data entered is correct. Implementing the required navigation behavior in a Windows Presentation Foundation WPF application can often be relatively straightforward because it provides direct support for navigation. However, navigation can be more complex to implement in applications that use the Model-View-ViewModel MVVM pattern or in composite applications that use multiple loosely-coupled modules. Prism provides guidance on implementing navigation in these situations. Navigation is defined as the process by which the application coordinates changes to its UI as a result of the user's interaction with the application or internal application state changes. UI updates can be accomplished by adding or removing elements from the application's visual tree, or by applying state changes to existing elements within the visual tree. WPF is a very flexible platform, and it is often possible to implement a particular navigation scenario using this approach. However, the approach that will be most appropriate for your application depends on multiple factors. Prism differentiates between the two styles of navigation described earlier. Navigation accomplished via state changes to existing controls in the visual tree is referred to as state-based navigation. Navigation accomplished via the addition or removal of elements from the visual tree is referred to as view-based navigation. Prism provides guidance on implementing both styles of navigation, focusing on the case where the application is using the Model-View-ViewModel MVVM pattern to separate the UI encapsulated in the view from the presentation logic and data encapsulated in the view model. In state-based navigation, the view that represents the UI is updated either through state changes in the view model or through the user's interaction within the view itself. In this style of navigation, instead of replacing the view with another view, the view's state is changed. Depending on how the view's state is changed, the updated UI may feel to the user like navigation. This style of navigation is not suitable for situations in which the UI has to present different data to the user or when the user has to perform a different task. In these situations, it is better to implement separate views and view models to represent the data or task, and then to navigate between them using view-based navigation, as described later on in this topic. Similarly, this style of navigation is not suitable if the number of UI state changes required to implement the navigation are overly complex because the view's definition can become large and difficult to maintain.

Easy way of navigate in WPF



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