Percent composition of sugar in bubble gum lab key

Percent Composition: A quick and dirty experiment

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials. Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter? All Categories. Grade Level. Resource Type. Log In Join Us. View Wish List View Cart. Results for percent composition lab Sort by: Relevance. You Selected: Keyword percent composition lab. Grades PreK. Other Not Grade Specific. Higher Education. Adult Education. Digital Resources for Students Google Apps. Internet Activities. English Language Arts. Foreign Language. Social Studies - History. History World History. For All Subject Areas. See All Resource Types. Percent Composition Lab. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the percent composition of carbon in a sample of sodium bicarbonate, NaHCO3. Reacting sodium bicarbonate with sulfuric acid will release carbon in the form of carbon dioxide. The mass of carbon dioxide that is released can be used to determine the perce. ScienceChemistryPhysical Science. ActivitiesLaboratory.

Percent Sugar in Bubble Gum Lab Chemistry, Biology, or Science Activity


Need Help? Last updated October 24, In this lab, students will be introduced to the concept of percent composition. Students will determine the amount of sweetener in various brands of gum by determining the mass difference of the gum before and after it is chewed. Percent composition is a common laboratory procedure that is used to identify a substance. So you will be able to calculate the percent of sugar in the gum, as well as the number of moles of sugar in the gum. You have to be an AACT member to access this content, but good news: anyone can join! Summary In this lab, students will be introduced to the concept of percent composition. Grade Level High school Objectives By the end of this lesson, students should be able to define percent composition. Teacher Notes Chapter Students should not mix gums; measure and chew one piece at a time. For an advanced chemistry setting, the teacher may require the students to chew each piece 25 times then weigh the gum, chew for another 25 times then weigh the gum, etc. For a lower level chemistry setting, the teacher may have more information already listed on the lab sheet to help guide the students through the lab more thoroughly. For the Student lesson. Background Percent composition is a common laboratory procedure that is used to identify a substance. Procedure Collect two sticks of gum one regular and one sugarless and a balance. Set your balance to zero. Place the gum wrapper on the scale and make sure that it does not show a mass zero the balance. Now place your unchewed piece of gum on the balance and record the mass in the data table below. Next, place the piece of gum into your mouth and chew it for five minutes set your timer! After five minutes, take the gum out of your mouth and place it back on the gum wrapper on the balance, weigh it and record the mass in the data table. Now take the sugarless gum and complete steps again. Complete the data table below. Use the percent composition equation for guidance. Equation To calculate percent composition you will use the following equation. Analysis How did the percent composition of your two regular and sugarless gum samples compare to each other? What is the mass of one mole of sugar? In other words, find the molar mass of the sugar.

Learning Activity 1: Percent Composition of Gum Lab


Need Help? Last updated March 19, In this lab, students will calculate the percent composition of sugar in gum and the percent composition of water in popcorn kernels. This lab will help prepare your students to meet the following scientific and engineering practices:. Identify who will be the gum chewer. They will need to chew a piece of gum for 15 minutes. Determine the mass of the unchewed gum. The gum cannot touch the surface of the balance. Note the flavor. Do not discard the wrapper. Chew gum for 5 minutes. Remass the gum, making sure it does not touch the balance. Repeat for two more 5 minute chew cycles, remass after each cycle. Determine the mass of 25 popcorn kernels. Use aluminum foil to make a bowl for the kernels. Use a mL beaker as a mold for the bowl, but do not keep the foil in the beaker. Place the kernels in the bowl. Use another piece of foil to cover the bowl and seal the two pieces of foil by folding them together so the popcorn does not fly out. Pop the kernels carefully over the Bunsen burner, using the tongs or forceps to gently heat the aluminum bowl. Shake regularly to ensure not burning a hole in the aluminum. Once your kernels have all popped, take the final mass of the popcorn. Dispose of the popcorn, do not eat it. Repeat the steps for a second and third set of data. Draw a graph of mass of gum vs time on the graph to the right:. You have to be an AACT member to access this content, but good news: anyone can join! Summary In this lab, students will calculate the percent composition of sugar in gum and the percent composition of water in popcorn kernels. Grade Level High School NGSS Alignment This lab will help prepare your students to meet the following scientific and engineering practices: Scientific and Engineering Practices: Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking Objectives By the end of this lesson, students should be able to: Calculate the percent composition of a substance in a sample.


Time Required: 2 hours 15 minutes 10 minutes for introducing materials, minutes after the associated activity to analyze and graph data, create a poster and share results with the class. Full Design Process These resources provide students with the opportunity to complete the full engineering design process to solve either a provided or student-generated design challenge. Most curricular materials in TeachEngineering are hierarchically organized; i. Some activities or lessons, however, were developed to stand alone, and hence, they might not conform to this strict hierarchy. Related Curriculum shows how the document you are currently viewing fits into this hierarchy of curricular materials. When students design experiments to test their hypotheses, they are acting like scientists and engineers who are researching and devising new creations, everything from new devices to new cleaning products. Scientists practice engineering whenever they design new experiments to test hypotheses. Chemical engineers design and test all sorts of products in laboratories, everything from bubble gum to cough syrup to medicines to shampoo. Each TeachEngineering lesson or activity is correlated to one or more K science, technology, engineering or math STEM educational standards. In the ASN, standards are hierarchically structured: first by source; e. Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred. Grades 6 - 8. Do you agree with this alignment? Thanks for your feedback! Alignment agreement: Thanks for your feedback! View aligned curriculum. Student chew a piece of gum until it loses its sweetness, and then leaves the gum to dry for several days before weighing it to determine the amount of mass lost. Through two lessons and their associated activities, students do the work of scientists by designing their own experiments to answer questions they generate. Through a simple activity involving surface tension, students learn what a hypothesis is—and isn't—and why generating a hypothesis is an impor In this lesson and activity, students conduct an experiment to determine whether or not the sense of smell is important to being able to recognize foods by taste. In an opening discussion, students explore why it might be adaptive for humans and other animals to be able to identify nutritious versus In this lesson and its associated activity, students conduct a simple test to determine how many drops of each of three liquids can be placed on a penny before spilling over. The three liquids are water, rubbing alcohol, and vegetable oil; because of their different surface tensions, more water can

Loop Audio Interval: 5s 10s 15s 20s 60s Play. Slide Notes. Download Go Live New! Bubble Gum Lab Share. Published on Nov 20, No Description. View Outline. In this experiment we chose a piece of gum to find the amount of sugar it contained in grams. We massed the gum in the wrapper after increments of 25 chews. We repeated this process until the mass of the gum and wrapper was the same multiple times in a row. Question 1: state the mass of sugar In your gum. Question 3: if your gum is actually Question 4: How many chews did it take for all the sugar to be removed and how can you be pretty sure this is true? Answer: chews and the gum started to lose flavor. What is the percent composition by mass of calcium in the compound calcium hydroxide? Answer: What is the percent composition by mass composition of carbon in C7H14? Write empirical formulas for octane, glucose, and 1-hexane? I had 1. My percent error was The sugar was gone from my gum in chews. I could tell because it lost flavor. I learned that there are many things that we can use chemistry for in the real world. Claire McLean.

Percent Sugar in Gum Lab



Comments on “Percent composition of sugar in bubble gum lab key

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>