Chainsaw clutch adjustment

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What are the indicators of a bad clutch

Husqvarna recommends adjusting the carburetor on the chain saw when you have filled the fuel tank ten times. This assures that the engine goes through the proper break-in period. Husqvarna recommends that a certified technician adjust the carburetor, but you can do it yourself and save some money. Adjusting a Husqvarna carburetor correctly ensures good fuel economy and protects the engine. When adjusting the chain saw carburetor, keep people and objects away from the chain bar to prevent damage and injury. Set the Husqvarna chain saw on a level surface. Ensure that there is nothing around the chain bar while you are adjusting the carburetor. Start the chain saw and allow the engine to warm for five minutes. Locate the three separate adjustment screws near the pull rope on the chain saw body. A letter is stamped next to each screw. Turn the screw with the "L" stamp clockwise with a screwdriver until the screw stops. Do not force the screw past the natural stop. Turn the screw counterclockwise until the engine idles smoothly without hesitation. Squeeze the throttle trigger to test the engine. Continue adjusting the "L" screw until the engine sounds smooth and accelerates smoothly. Place the screwdriver on the screw with a "T' stamp. This is the idle-adjustment screw. Turn the screw clockwise until the chain starts to turn on the chain bar. Immediately turn the screw counterclockwise until the chain stops turning. The engine should maintain idle speed without the chain moving on the chain bar. Rotate the "H" adjustment screw counterclockwise with the screwdriver until the screw stops.

How to Grease the Clutch on a Stihl Chainsaw


When you finish a cut with your chainsaw and you release the throttle, you definitely want the chain to stop turning. If it doesn't, and you make a false move, such as turning around too quickly, you could damage something or seriously injure someone. A simple carburetor adjustment may correct the problem. If it doesn't, then it could mean the clutch doesn't disengage. That's usually a sign that the clutch needs to be replaced. The most probable -- and easiest to fix -- cause of chain rotation while the chainsaw engine idles is a poorly adjusted idle setting on the carburetor. The result is that too much fuel is delivered to the combustion chamber when the throttle is released, and the engine doesn't really slow. Correcting the problem requires adjusting the idle screw -- usually marked "I" --on the carburetor. The idle screw usually is near or behind the air filter. Adjust the screw to restrict fuel delivery by turning it clockwise with a screwdriver until the chain stops turning. The saw must be running when you do this. Turn the screw slightly counterclockwise if the engine starts to sputter. You may notice that in addition to the chain not stopping the chainsaw has other symptoms, such as smoking and the engine racing, which can be caused by a rich fuel mixture. Achieving better performance from the chainsaw may be possible by adjusting its low-speed carburetor screw -- usually marked "L" or "LA" -- to create a slightly leaner fuel mixture. In order to do that, warm up the chainsaw's engine, and then, with the engine running, turn the low-speed carburetor screw clockwise one-quarter turn or less. A dirty air filter also can be responsible for an overly rich fuel mixture. Take out the air filter, and, if it's salvageable, clean it with compressed air or by washing it with soapy water. Otherwise, replace the air filter. If the chainsaw's performance doesn't seem to be an issue, you can narrow the possible causes of the chain's problem to one: the clutch. A chainsaw is equipped with a centrifugal clutch, which is designed to engage the chain sprocket and the motor only when the throttle is engaged.

How to Adjust the Roll Pin on a Husqvarna Chainsaw


The clutch on a Stihl chainsaw works through a process called centrifugal force. When the clutch reaches a certain speed the outward force expands the clutch shoes, which engage the clutch drum and sprocket, spinning your chain. Clutch removal on a Stihl chainsaw will need to be done if you notice any grinding noises or if you notice you are wearing out chains more quickly than usual. Clutch removal requires a few specialty tools: a rubber piston stop tool and a circular piece, called the clutch removal tool, that fits over the clutch and allows you to rotate the clutch hub without damaging the clutch. While some places may recommend blocking the piston with a piece of your starter rope, if it isn't inserted when the piston is on its upstroke you can push the rope into the exhaust port of the muffler. If the rope gets stuck in the exhaust port you can damage the cylinder, piston and exhaust port. It is far cheaper to order the specialty stop tool from Stihl. You will also need a wrench, socket wrench, screwdriver and multipurpose engine grease. After you've blocked the piston, you will be able to turn the clutch without also rotating the crankshaft. On Stihl saws, the clutch drum and sprocket sit above the clutch assembly so you will need to remove these before you can remove the clutch. The clutch removal tool fits precisely around the outer ring of the clutch and will allow you to pull it off gently, as it keeps the clutch from spinning while you remove it. Stihl clutches use a reverse thread on the nut, so to remove the clutch you must rotate the clutch tool clockwise, opposite from most screws. Do not use any hammers or punches to try and pound the clutch free from the crankshaft, as you can damage the crankshaft and engine. With the clutch assembly free from the crankshaft, you can separate the clutch springs and clutch shoes from their holding slots. Stihl manufactures a specialty metal hook for the springs, but if you're careful you can use a screwdriver to wedge the springs off their holding hooks. Make sure you wear safety glasses as these springs can fly off unexpectedly and cause injury. The clutch shoes can be pried off their retaining slots with the wrench. Installation of the clutch should always be in reverse order as removal and disassembly. The clutch shoes need to fit into their holding slots. The clutch springs need to be bent into place. The clutch assembly will need to be anchored to the crankshaft using the clutch removal tool and screwing the bolt counterclockwise. The needle bearing will also need a coating of multipurpose engine grease to ensure too much friction doesn't overheat the clutch parts. The clutch drum, sprocket and washer will fit on top of the clutch assembly. Remember to remove the piston stop tool carefully before restarting the engine. Currently based in Minneapolis, Minn. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in creative writing from the University of Montana. Hunker may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story. Stihl chainsaws use a centrifugal clutch that forces the clutch outward, whereby engaging the sprocket and chain. Share this article.

Stihl Chainsaw Clutch Removal


In some ways, a centrifugal clutch is the one device that makes small, gas-powered tools and conveyances possible. Effectively the centrifugal clutch does the same job as a torque converter, allowing an engine to idle at low rpm and engage at higher rpm where it makes adequate power. Without one, you'd have to manually disengage the clutch on your lawn mower, chainsaw or moped every time you slowed down, much as you do in a manual-transmission car. But centrifugal clutches are touchy things by nature; the smallest maladjustment can drastically change their performance and engagement rpm. Periodic adjustment to account for wear on the springs and clutch material is fairly simple in most cases. Locate the clutch on your engine; consult your owner's manual if necessary. If there is a cover over the clutch, remove the fasteners that hold it to the clutch and pull it off. Select a box wrench that fits the large lock-nut protruding from the center of the clutch case. Loosen the nut by turning it counterclockwise, but do not remove it. Using the flathead screwdriver, turn the adjuster screw located in the center of the locknut clockwise one turn. Slowly turn the adjuster screw counterclockwise until you feel slight resistance. Stop turning the screw. Turn the screw very slightly clockwise to back it off, no more than an one-eighth to one-quarter of a turn. Hold the screw steady with the screwdriver and tighten the lock-nut. You only need the nut snug, or "hand tight. Test-drive or test-run the tool or vehicle to ensure the clutch engages at the appropriate rpm, and that clutch engagement is neither too slow nor too sudden. If the clutch engages too quickly, back the adjustment screw off a half-turn. If engagement is too high or slow, tighten the adjusting screw up a bit. This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us. Step 1 Locate the clutch on your engine; consult your owner's manual if necessary. Step 2 Select a box wrench that fits the large lock-nut protruding from the center of the clutch case. Step 3 Using the flathead screwdriver, turn the adjuster screw located in the center of the locknut clockwise one turn. Step 4 Slowly turn the adjuster screw counterclockwise until you feel slight resistance. Step 5 Hold the screw steady with the screwdriver and tighten the lock-nut. Step 6 Test-drive or test-run the tool or vehicle to ensure the clutch engages at the appropriate rpm, and that clutch engagement is neither too slow nor too sudden. Place the cover to the clutch back on the engine, and tighten it down. Tip Your centrifugal clutch may have a different type of adjuster screw, such as a hex-key screw. Check your owner's manual for the right tool to have for adjusting the screw. Warning Make sure that you test-drive the vehicle or use the tool long enough to move it through all its gears and speeds so you can determine if the centrifugal clutch is correctly adjusted.

Why Does My Chainsaw Chain Keep Turning?

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How to Replace the Clutch on a Chainsaw



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