Brazil film review

Brazil: No 17 best sci-fi and fantasy film of all time

Forgot your password? Don't have an account? Sign up here. Got more questions about news letters? Email support rottentomatoes. Already have an account? Log in here. By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policiesand to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes and Fandango. Please enter your email address and we will email you a new password. We want to hear what you have to say but need to verify your account. Just leave us a message here and we will work on getting you verified. Its story takes some dubious turns, but a high-caliber cast and a gripping pace fashion The Boys from Brazil into an effective thriller. Tap to review this movie. Rate this movie. Oof, that was Rotten. Meh, it passed the time. So Fresh: Absolute Must See! You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket. AMC Coming Soon. Cinemark Coming Soon. Regal Coming Soon. By opting to have your ticket verified for this movie, you are allowing us to check the email address associated with your Rotten Tomatoes account against an email address associated with a Fandango ticket purchase for the same movie. This picture is another of [producer] Lew Grade's international blockbuster packages; the deals are worked out in terms of story elements that will sell and of performers with followings in as many markets as possible. Pauline Kael. An impressive feat of carefully designed and modulated academic filmmaking, a class job in the tradition of Hitchcock or Wyler at their most polished. Gary Arnold. The plot is less suspenseful than the overacting contest between the two leads, Laurence Olivier and Gregory Peck, who spend most of their screen time one-upping each other in affectations. Dave Kehr.

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Sign In. Brazil Hide Spoilers. And it is kind of hard to put the label of any one particular genre on the film; it's generally referred to as "dystopian science fiction" which certainly isn't wrongbut it's also a satire, a drama, a black comedy and perhaps even a fantasy film. Like many other dystopian sci-fi films e. FahrenheitEquilibrium, The Hunger GamesBrazil depicts a totalitarian society, but that's about as far as the similarities with other films go. The whole design of Brazil's crazy world is unlike anything I've ever seen in other movies with the exception perhaps of those made by the same filmmaker. Where films with similar themes typically go for a futuristic look that is defined by all the technological advancements the writers and filmmakers can dream of, Terry Gilliam chooses the complete opposite direction. In his film, technology seems to have made no progress since somewhere around the forties or fifties, and what technology there is doesn't exactly look very reliable. And unlike other dystopian films, it's not primarily the bleak aspects of a totalitarian society Gilliam wants to explore; in his film, he wants to show how hilariously insane, inept and ridiculous many of the mechanisms and instruments of oppression truly are. In that sense, Brazil is mainly a satire at least that's how I perceive itand it is often either darkly funny or downright hilarious. There is simply not a dull moment in the film: it's a wild ride that never lets up and almost every image on the screen practically bursts with clever often hilarious details; from the way food is served in restaurants to how the benefits of plastic surgery are presented, Gilliam's imagination can only be marveled at. His vision of a bureaucracy gone mad is probably the most entertaining nightmare ever put on film I'm talking about the director's cut, of course. A masterpiece that gets even better after repeat viewings: 10 stars out of Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote. An extraordinary movie, original, funny and frightening. Terry Gilliam's masterpiece. Infofreak 6 April I really can't tell you how much my first viewing of this movie knocked me out. Nearly twenty years ago, before Terry Gilliam's reputation is what it is today, seeing this in a cinema without knowing ANYTHING about it, it was one of the most unforgettable movie experiences of my life! Still is. I was a Python fan since childhood and well aware of Gilliam's animation work, but nothing could prepare you for just how bizarre, funny, scary and disturbing 'Brazil' is. It's still one of the most original and inventive science fiction movies ever made, with a surreal, retro future quite unlike anything seen on a movie screen before or since. Gilliam mixes Python's anarchic, intellectual humour with Orwell, Kafka and Theatre Of The Absurd elements and comes up with something really special. John Sladek kinda sorta wrote some stories in a similar territory before this, and Dean Motter has written some comics since, but 'Brazil' is really in a world of its own! Jonathan Pryce was fairly obscure at the time and an odd choice to play the leading role, but is perfectly cast, and it's hard to think of an actor who would have been as convincing and sympathetic. This is still an utterly brilliant movie, one of the very best of the last twenty-five years. I can't recommend this movie highly enough, it is a masterpiece pure and simple. JackLint 18 October I have read a lot of understandably negative reviews of the movie 'Brazil. With all these things going against it, Brazil is clearly not a film for everyone.

THE SCREEN: 'BRAZIL,' FROM TERRY GILLIAM


Forgot your password? Don't have an account? Sign up here. Got more questions about news letters? Email support rottentomatoes. Already have an account? Log in here. By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policiesand to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes and Fandango. Please enter your email address and we will email you a new password. We want to hear what you have to say but need to verify your account. Just leave us a message here and we will work on getting you verified. Brazil, Terry Gilliam's visionary Orwellian fantasy, is an audacious dark comedy, filled with strange, imaginative visuals. Tap to review this movie. Rate this movie. Oof, that was Rotten. Meh, it passed the time. So Fresh: Absolute Must See! You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket. AMC Coming Soon. Cinemark Coming Soon. Regal Coming Soon.

Central Station


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Bacurau review – ultraviolent freakout in Brazil's outback

The tone of life in Rio de Janeiro is established in an early scene in Walter Salles ' "Central Station," as a train pulls alongside the platform and passengers crawl through the windows to grab seats ahead of the people who enter through the doors. In this dog-eat-dog world, Dora Fernanda Montenegro has a little stand in the rail station where she writes letters for people who are illiterate. A cynic, she destroys most of the letters. One day a mother and son use her services to dictate a letter to the woman's missing husband. Soon after, the mother is struck and killed by a bus. The kid knows one person in Rio: Dora. He approaches her for help, and her response is brief: "Scram! This is not a heartwarming movie about a woman trying to help a pathetic orphan, but a hard-edged film about a woman who thinks only of her own needs. After various attempts to rid herself of young Josue Vincius de Oliveirashe finally sells him to an adoption agency and uses the money to buy herself a new TV set. There's not a shred of doubt or remorse as she settles down before the new set. But the whole story is known by her friend Irene Marilia Perawho played the prostitute who adopts the street kid in " Pixote ". Whether they find the father is not really the point; the film is about their journey and relationship. The movie's success rests largely on the shoulders of Fernanda Montenegro, an actress who successfully defeats any temptation to allow sentimentality to wreck her relationship with the child. She understands that the film is not really about the boy's search for his father, but about her own reawakening. This process is measured out so carefully that we don't even notice the point at which she crosses over into a gentler person. The boy, year-old Vincius de Oliveira, was discovered by the director in an airport, shining shoes. He asked Walter Salles for the price of a sandwich, and Salles, who had been trying for months to cast this role, looked at him thoughtfully and saw young Josue. Whether he is an actor or not I cannot say. He plays Josue so well, the performance is transparent. I hope he avoids the fate of Fernando Ramos da Silva, the young orphan who was picked off the streets to star in "Pixote," later returned to them and was murdered. I met de Oliveira at the Toronto Film Festival, where, barbered and in a new suit, he looked like a Rotarian's nephew. It's strange about a movie like this. The structure intends us to be moved by the conclusion, but the conclusion is in many not all ways easy to anticipate. What moved me was the process, the journey, the change in the woman, the subtlety of sequences like the one where she falls for a truck driver who doesn't fall for her. It's in such moments that the film has its magic. The ending can take care of itself. Roger Ebert was the film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times from until his death in Inhe won the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism. Rated R For Language. Vincius De Oliveira as Josue. Fernanda Montenegro as Dora. Soia Lira as Ana. Marilia Pera as Irene. Reviews Central Station. Roger Ebert December 25, In theaters. The Plot Against America. The Invisible Man. Blood on Her Name.

Brazil - Renegade Cut



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